In Minnesota we know how cold it can get at night.  I look at other states when they think it's "cold".  Come up here to the "bold North" and really experience some cold weather.

Many nights I have trouble sleeping.  Total insomnia.  Mostly it's because I can't shut my brain off.  I think about all the things that could happen, things that I have to do, maybe something I forgot to do, stuff I have no control over, especially at 2 am.  Eventually, I do fall asleep, but I wind up with about 4 hours on an average of sleep each night.  That's really not very healthy.

Now, a Dr. that is also a TicTok star says that it's a good idea to wear socks to bed.  Now, we, in this colder climate (6 months out of the year) might find this a good idea.  But those other months, I don't think so.  But Dr. Jess Andrade says that if you wear socks to bed, even when we aren't experiencing -20 temps that you will fall asleep faster.

Get our free mobile app

I'd have to first get over the fact that it feels weird to do that.  But apparently there is a great reason to do this... like a scientific reason.  The socks help the rest of your body cool while your feet are warm, and this help you sleep.

@doctorjesssI wear socks to bed so don’t come at me im not weird♬ original sound - PresleyWalker

She also mentions the 10-3-2-1-0 method of getting to sleep.  This is what you should do along with the sock method.

10 hours before bed, no caffeine.  3 hours before bed, no food or alcoholic drinks. 2 hours before bed no work of any kind, 1 hour before bed stop looking at any screens. And the amount of times you should hit the snooze button when your alarm goes off.... ZERO!  I usually hit that thing just one time.  Not to go back to sleep, but to give myself 7 minutes to kind of wake up before actually getting up.

The screen thing would be difficult to do for me.  The rest of it seems totally doable.  I'll have to work on the sock thing, though.  That might be a situation of "just get used to it".

10 Things Minnesotans Do During a Polar Vortex