If you're tasked with making Thanksgiving dinner for your family this year, it's going to cost you a lot more to host.

Last Thanksgiving was the first time I'd ever made a turkey. I didn't realize how expensive they were. But, this year, it's going to be even more spendy to get one.

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According to NPR, the cost of Thanksgiving dinner for a group of 10 people is up 14% from last year. That price includes turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, rolls with butter, peas, cranberries, a veggie tray, pumpkin pie with whipped cream, coffee, and milk, with leftovers.

In fact, NPR says, "The turkey itself costs 24% more than last year ... it's $23.99 for a 16-pound turkey."

I noticed that food prices increased a lot. Many of our local restaurants offering 'ready to eat after you re-heat' meals increased their prices by $10 for a family of 4.

If you're trying to keep your overall costs low, here are some things you can do to not break the bank if you're someone who didn't shop for your items weeks ago.

  • Try asking your guests to bring side dishes to your Thanksgiving dinner. Make it a potluck!
  • Don't overmake food. You should get an idea of how many people you'll be serving and plan accordingly.
  • Make some things from scratch, like pies, rolls, and bread. There are a few bakeries in the area selling pies for upwards of $40 each. You could make a few pies yourself for that price.
  • Buy things in bulk. Use this as an opportunity to buy things you'll use on Thanksgiving but also that you're going to use later.
  • Use food you've already got in the house. I'm sure you have a few cans of corn in the pantry, or green beans for your casserole.
  • Skip appetizers ... the meal should be enough. Then, maybe your guests will finally have room for dessert.

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